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Bug Reporting – Art and Advocacy

New:
When a bug is found/revealed for the first time, the software tester communicates it to his/her team leader (Test Leader) in order to confirm if that is a valid bug. After getting confirmation from the Test Lead, the software tester logs the bug and the status of ‘New’ is assigned to the bug.

Assigned:
After the bug is reported as ‘New’, it comes to the Development Team. The development team verifies if the bug is valid. If the bug is valid, development leader assigns it to a developer to fix it and a status of ‘Assigned’ is assigned to it.


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Open:
Once the developer starts working on the bug, he/she changes the status of the bug to ‘Open’ to indicate thgooat he/she is working on it to find a solution.

Fixed:
Once the developer makes necessary changes in the code and verifies the code, he/she marks the bug as ‘Fixed’ and passes it over to the Development Lead in order to pass it to the Testing team.

Pending Retest:
After the bug is fixed, it is passed back to the testing team to get retested and the status of ‘Pending Retest’ is assigned to it.

Retest:
The testing team leader changes the status of the bug, which is previously marked with ‘Pending Retest’ to ‘Retest’ and assigns it to a tester for retesting.

Closed:
After the bug is assigned a status of ‘Retest’, it is again tested. If the problem is solved, the tester closes it and marks it with ‘Closed’ status.

Reopen:
If after retesting the software for the bug opened, if the system behaves in the same way or same bug arises once again, then the tester reopens the bug and again sends it back to the developer marking its status as ‘Reopen’.

Pending Reject:
If the developers think that a particular behavior of the system, which the tester reports as a bug has to be same and the bug is invalid, in that case, the bug is rejected and marked as ‘Pending Reject’.

Rejected:
If the Testing Leader finds that the system is working according to the specifications or the bug is invalid as per the explanation from the development, he/she rejects the bug and marks its status as ‘Rejected’.

Postponed:
Sometimes, testing of a particular bug has to be postponed for an indefinite period. This situation may occur because of many reasons, such as unavailability of Test data, unavailability of particular functionality etc. That time, the bug is marked with ‘Postponed’ status.

Deferred:
In some cases a particular bug stands no importance and is needed to be/can be avoided, that time it is marked with ‘Deferred’ status.



1. New
2. Open
3. Assign
4. Test
5. Verified
6. Deferred
7. Reopened
8. Duplicate
9. Rejected and
10. Closed




Guidelines on deciding the Severity of Bug:
Indicate the impact each defect has on testing efforts or users and administrators of the application under test. This information is used by developers and management as the basis for assigning priority of work on defects.
A sample guideline for assignment of Priority Levels during the product test phase includes:
1. Critical / Show Stopper — An item that prevents further testing of the product or function under test can be classified as Critical Bug. No workaround is possible for such bugs. Examples of this include a missing menu option or security permission required to access a function under test.
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2. Major / High — A defect that does not function as expected/designed or cause other functionality to fail to meet requirements can be classified as Major Bug. The workaround can be provided for such bugs. Examples of this include inaccurate calculations; the wrong field being updated, etc.
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3. Average / Medium — The defects which do not conform to standards and conventions can be classified as Medium Bugs. Easy workarounds exists to achieve functionality objectives. Examples include matching visual and text links which lead to different end points.
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4. Minor / Low — Cosmetic defects which does not affect the functionality of the system can be classified as Minor Bugs.
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